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6 Ways Trainers Can Integrate Outdoor Workouts into Client Programs

May 10, 2017 By Zogics

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People will be spending more time outdoors now that the weather has warmed up. This does not necessarily have to be bad news for trainers. It is possible to integrate outdoor workouts into training sessions. All it takes is a little bit of creativity.

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Jump Rope Workout

Jumping rope might seem simple yet there are numerous ways to enhance its complexity and create a strenuous outdoor workout. Jumping rope will boost your coordination, help you shed fat and tone your muscles. You can jump rope as a precursor to another workout or rely on it as a workout in its own right.

Perform 10 reps of varying jump styles. Mix some short sprints in between each jump type to enhance the workout's intensity. Jump rope variations include the typical two-foot jump, same foot jumps, alternating single leg jumps, crossing the rope between hands, lifting the knees on jumps and crossing the feet in and out in a lateral manner.

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Hill Sprints

Hill sprints provide quite the challenging workout. The greatest wide receiver in NFL history, Jerry Rice, swore by hill workouts. This form of high intensity interval training (HIIT) burns away calories without taking too much time. Hills serve as a taxing form of functional strength training as they force one's bodyweight to fight gravity. The end result is enhanced strength across nearly the entire body. Hill sprints also serve to improve running technique, stamina and speed to boot.

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Stand-up Paddleboarding

Stand-up paddleboarding is an excellent means of toning the entire body. The beauty of this exercise is that it is fun. Stand-up paddleboarding does not feel like traditional exercise. If you find stand-up paddleboarding to be difficult, don't give up without giving it a second and third chance. You will eventually get the hang of it.

This activity involves standing on a long board and paddling across the water. You'll use nearly every muscle in your body to traverse the water. Stand-up paddleboarding really works your abdominal muscles, serving to bolster your core.

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Sand Sprinting

Sprinting on sand forces your body to work extra hard. Instead of running at a moderate pace in a straight line to cover mile after mile, opt for sprints. Put half a dozen cones in a row about 10-15 yards apart from one another. These are the "stations" to which you will sprint. Just be sure to stretch your legs before going all out with sand sprints.

Start by sprinting from the first cone to the next in line. Perform your choice of stationary exercises, be it crunches, push-ups, jumping jacks etc. Then sprint to the next cone and perform another stationary workout. Repeat until all of the cone stations are complete. Be sure to rest half a minute between every sprint or every couple of sprints so you don't overtax your body. Don't view these rests as taking the “easy way out”. This form of HIIT training has been proven to be optimal for body conditioning.

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Fitness scavenger hunt

The appeal of this workout is that it does not feel like conventional exercise. Think of it as an Easter egg hunt of sorts for fitness-minded adults. Begin by mapping out a route. Write down half a dozen bodyweight exercises such as squat jumps, push-ups etc. Then jot down a corresponding landmark for each exercise that you'll likely spot along your run. Examples of “landmarks” include red lights, dogs being walked, sports cars, and so on.

Once you spot one of your chosen landmarks, stop to perform 10 reps of the corresponding bodyweight exercise. As an example, if you wrote down “fire hydrant” next to “push-ups”, drop for a set of 10 each time you encounter one. You'll have a blast performing this highly unique workout. This exercise will also help you “live in the moment” and get your mind off work and other responsibilities.

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Basketball

Basketball provides quite the intense workout. It requires the use of leg, arm and core muscles. If the basketball court is occupied, look for an open volleyball court. Volleyball also works the entire body. If you can't find enough people to play a full-court game of basketball or volleyball, get creative. Sprint from one end of the court to the other. Run forward, then run backward from end-to-end. Repeat five times.

If you feel exhausted toward the final sprints, reduce your pace to a light jog. Transition to lateral hops. This exercise requires jumping over and back all the way along the full court line. Perform 30 hops as you cross the entire court length. Side shuffles are the final component of a basketball workout. Side shuffle the full distance of the court. Then side shuffle the distance back the other way. Perform six full-court side shuffles to complete the workout.


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